Report of research results:Conservatism and variability of gene expression profiles among homeologous transcription factors in Xenopus laevis

2017-7-13

Reporter

Minoru Watanabe, Ph.D.Professor (Institute of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Tokushima University)

 

Title

Conservatism and variability of gene expression profiles among homeologous transcription factors in Xenopus laevis

 

Research members

    • Minoru Watanabe (Tokushima University)
    • Yuuri Yasuoka(Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University)
    • Shuuji Mawaribuchi, Michihiko Ito(Kitasato University)
    • Aya Kuretani, Mariko Kondo, Masanori Taira(The University of Tokyo)
    • Haruki Ochi(Yamagata University)
    • Hajime Ogino (currently Hiroshima University)(Nagahama Institute of Bio-Science and Technology)
    • Akimasa Fukui(currently Chuo University)(Hokkaido University)
    • Tsutomu Kinoshita(Rikkyo University)

 

Journal

Conservatism and variability of gene expression profiles among homeologous transcription factors in Xenopus laevis.

Minoru Watanabe, Yuuri Yasuoka, Shuuji Mawaribuchi, Aya Kuretani, Michihiko Ito, Mariko Kondo, Haruki Ochi, Hajime Ogino, Akimasa Fukui, Masanori Taira, Tsutomu Kinoshita. Developmental Biology (a special issue for Xenopus genome analyses), Volume 426, Issue 2, 15 June 2017, Pages 301–324.

 

Research Summary

The transcription factors (TFs) regulate the expression of other genes. The genes encoding TFs are called “master genes” and thought to have important roles for organisms. The genes used for creating iPS cells by Dr. Yamanaka are also the ones encoding the TFs. Having the genomic information of Xenopus laevis (Nature, October 20, 2016)http://www.tokushima-u.ac.jp/english/docs/2016102000020/, we studied structures and expression patters of genes encoding the TFs comprehensively.

 

X. laevis is an allotetraploid animal and has two chromosome pairs (homoelogus chromosomes) from the extinct two different ancestors. Although many X. laevis genes have homeolog pairs, some would get lost and others might get novel functions during evolution. We studied 412 genes of TFs and found that these genes are evolutionary very stable compared with other genes, consisting the idea that they have important roles in the organisms. The expression of most homeolog pairs showed similar patterns, whereas some showed quite different patterns, suggesting that these genes are getting novel functions during evolution.

 

Future Prospects

We performed comprehensive analyses of the genes encoding the TFs of X. laevis. Since the TFs have important roles in the organisms, mutation of these genes has been known to cause genetic diseases or cancers. Most of X. laevis genes encoding TFs are present in human, indicating that the results obtained from this work are also useful for the study of human diseases and cancers. This work also shows the statistic comparison of gene expression from homeolog pairs. This would become the standard for the similar study in future.

 

 

Others

For the details of this research, please refer the Web site listed below.

 

Editorial for this issue

Paper

お問い合わせ

広報室
電話:088-656-7021